Page from Tales of a Parrot (Tuti-nama): Fifth night: The monkey slain, his blood to be used as medicine for the ailing prince he has bitten

Page from Tales of a Parrot (Tuti-nama): Fifth night: The monkey slain, his blood to be used as medicine for the ailing prince he has bitten

c. 1560

Part of a set. See all set records

Opaque watercolor, ink and gold on paper

Gift of Mrs. A. Dean Perry 1962.279.33.b

Fun Fact

Under the covers is the hand that got infected from the monkey bite.

Description

Wounded by the chess-playing monkey’s bite, the prince’s hand became increasingly infected. The only cure, his doctors said, was to apply the blood of the monkey to the wound and let it dry. Reluctantly, the prince allowed the monkey to be killed. Two men accomplish this serious work at the left.
In the right margin is written the name of the artist, the celebrated Basavana. The Tuti-nama contains the earliest known paintings by the prolific master who was instrumental in shaping the Mughal painting style over subsequent decades.

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