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Exhibition Preview: Chaekgeori: Pleasure of Possessions in Korean Painted Screens

CMA's next exhibition Chaekgeori: Pleasure of Possessions in Korean Painted Screens opens this Sat, 8/5!

See the first international exhibition in the US to explore the unique type of still-life painting called chaekgeori, translated as “books and things.” 

This show explores the stylistic evolution of chaekgeori screens and reveals surprising artistic evidence of cross-cultural interaction between early modern Korea and the world. Chaekgeori artists drew inspiration from Chinese display cabinets of the Qing period (1644–1911), and adapted European painting techniques to produce striking illusionistic effects. These screens received high praise from King Jeongjo (reigned 1776–1800), and soon became popular among the educated elite. By the late 1800s, chaekgeori screens furnished the studies of scholars and aristocrats as well as the homes of middle-class merchants.

See works from the show below!

Chaekgeori (Books and Things), late 1800s. Korea. Eight-panel folding screen, ink and color on paper; each panel: 119 x 51 cm. Korean Folk Village Museum, Yongin.

 

Chaekgeori (Books and Things), early 1900s. Korea. Eight-panel folding screen, ink and color on paper; each panel: 105 x 46.5 cm. Private collection.

 

Chaekgeori (Books and Things), late 1800s. Korea. Six-panel folding screen, ink and color on paper; each panel: 67 x 33 cm. Private collection.

 

Chaekgeori (Books and Things), late 1800s. Korea. Eight-panel folding screen, ink and color on paper; each panel: 55.7 x 31.7 cm. Songok Memorial Hall, Mokpo, Korea.

Library 3, 1995–2001. Kyoungtack Hong (Korean b. 1968). Oil on canvas; 181 x 226.1 cm. © Kyoungtack Hong.

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