Rodin's The Thinker

All told there are, twenty-five 72" enlarged versions of Auguste Rodin's The Thinker. Of these, fewer than ten were cast and patinated during his lifetime. One of the last Rodin supervised casts can be found in Cleveland, Ohio, where it sits directly in front of the Cleveland Museum of Art. This cast was acquired in 1916, and given to the Cleveland Museum of Art early in 1917.

 

About The Thinker

Cleveland Museum of Art: Building

Cleveland architects Benjamin Hubbell and W. Dominick Benes were engaged to design and construct the new museum. After a study of museum buildings nationally and worldwide, Hubbell and Benes designed a Beaux Arts style building with two wings flanking a central rotunda. Construction began in 1913 and was completed for the June 1916 opening. The gallery level housed the main entrance on the south side of the building facing Wade Park. Fifteen galleries plus the Armor Court and Interior Garden Court surrounded the Rotunda.

René Lalique, Jeweler of Nature

The astounding success of Parisian goldsmith René Lalique was the result of a perfect storm of tragedienne, a rave for all things Japanese, and a world's fair. Lalique's luscious jewelry adorned the stage in Sarah Bernhardt's melodramatic roles of Théodora and Gismonde in the mid 1890's. In Paris Samuel Bing's new house of decoration, "La Maison de l'Art Nouveau," offered for sale both striking Lalique creations and Japanese decorative works of intense simplicity.

Picture This: CMA Photographic History

The Museum Archives houses the documentary history of the museum. Much of this history consists of the written word. However, it also includes documentary evidence in the form of images. Pictures provide unique information that cannot be found in other types of documents. They are created to serve a number of purposes including augmenting the written record. In some instances, however, the only evidence of an historical event is photographic. Much can be deduced from images of people, places, and events.

Satire and Social Commentary The Life of George Cruikshank

George Cruikshank (1792-1878), one of the most prolific illustrators and satirists working in England, was praised as the "modern Hogarth"1 during his lifetime. He was a child of the eighteenth century and of the city of London. Born in the fashionable Bloomsbury district he was a member of the Cruikshank family of caricaturists and artists. His father Isaac was a well-known engraver and caricaturist. From an early age George worked at his side learning the techniques of etching, watercolor, and sketching.

Alfred Stieglitz and Camera Work

Alfred Stieglitz, photographer, editor, writer, and gallery owner, was an integral figure in the development of 20th century photography and modern art in America at the turn-of-the-century. Born in Hoboken, New Jersey in 1864, Stieglitz became fascinated with photography at an early age. His father Edward, a prosperous wool merchant, was able to educate his children abroad. In 1882, Alfred enrolled in the Technische Hochschule in Berlin where he studied photochemistry.

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