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Today at the Museum
Sunday, March 1, 2015

12:30 pm
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Experience the brilliant light of the Ames Family Atrium while drawing a live model! Other afternoons will be spent in the galleries.

Sunday, March 1, 2015, 1:00 pm to 4:20 pm

Winner of the Palme d’Or at last year’s Cannes Film Festival, this new film by Turkey’s foremost filmmaker is set in a gorgeous hotel on an Anatolian mountaintop. There the haughty innkeeper caters to his guests, insults his younger wife, and looks down on the poor residents of his shabby properties at the base of the mountain.

1:00 pm
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Atrium

Public tours are offered daily at 1:00 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday. Tours depart from the Information Desk in the Atrium. Additional tours Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 p.m.

2:00 pm
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Kelvin and Eleanor Smith Foundation Exhibition Hall

Explore the special exhibition Senufo: Art and Identity in West Africa with our docents. Tour ticket required.

2:00 pm
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Atrium

Public tours are offered daily at 1:00 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday. Tours depart from the Information Desk in the Atrium. Additional tours Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 p.m.

This exhibition, comprised primarily of work from the museum’s collection, examines some of the ways photography has been used to construct identities, whether fact or fiction.

Although video art emerged in the 1960s with the advent of video recording devices, the medium gained traction as its ascendance coincided with the increased importance of television within daily life, which forever changed the ways in which images were distributed, consumed, and eventually reconstituted. Five Pioneers brings together landmark works by artists who helped pioneer the medium of video art.

An exhibition of 15 botanically inspired luxury textiles drawn from CMA’s exemplary collection.

Fine and distinctive forms of sculpture eventually classified as Senufo attracted the attention of art dealers, collectors, and artists in Europe and North America early in the 20th century, a time when people on both continents began evaluating objects from Africa as “art” rather than ethnographic artifacts.

Several 16th- and 17th-century prints and drawings of occult imagery will provide visual context for Rosa’s images while underscoring his originality regarding the traditional iconography of witches and magicians found in prints circulating throughout Europe at the time.

A selection of about 60 drawings and prints from the museum's permanent collection will explore the various ways in which music and music-making have been represented in Europe and the United States from the 15th through the 20th century.