A
News Release
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

The Cleveland Museum of Art Exhibition Schedule through June 2023

Thursday, August 11, 2022

Mark Nylander

The Cleveland Museum of Art
mnylander [at] clevelandart.org
216-707-6897

Upcoming

Text and Image in Southern Asia
August 26, 2022, to March 5, 2023
Indian Painting Gallery | Gallery 242B
Images

This exhibition proudly displays the illuminated manuscripts from the CMA’s important collection that were translated, identified and dated by Phyllis Granoff, Lex Hixon Professor Emerita of World Religions at Yale University, whose work we honor on the occasion of her recent retirement. Lavish devotional books made for Jain and Buddhist communities are included, with examples from India, Sri Lanka, Nepal and Myanmar (Burma), ranging from the 1100s to 1800s. Complementing the display are Buddhist and Jain paintings, votive sculptures and vintage photographs of temples and sites that are major repositories of medieval manuscripts. 

 

The Medieval Top Seller: The Book of Hours 
August 26, 2022, to July 30, 2023 
Gallery 115 
No images available

A book of hours is a devotional book that was extremely popular in the Middle Ages; in fact, it is estimated that a quarter of households owned one. It was intended for the vast majority of laypeople and contains daily prayers and those used on special occasions. Fully customizable, these precious volumes are windows into the medieval world and the lives of their original owners. 

 

Impressionism to Modernism: The Keithley Collection
Ticketed
September 11, 2022, to January 8, 2023
The Kelvin and Eleanor Smith Foundation Exhibition Hall
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The exhibition celebrates the extraordinary gift and promised gift of more than 100 works of art that Clevelanders Joseph P. and Nancy F. Keithley made to the Cleveland Museum of Art in March 2020—the most significant gift in more than 60 years, since the bequest of Leonard C. Hanna Jr. in 1958. This is the first time the gift is on view in its entirety.

Throughout two decades of collecting, the Keithleys selected works of art to complement and enrich the CMA’s collection. At times, the Keithleys built upon a strength in the museum’s collection; on other occasions, they acquired a work of art that would bring something entirely new to the collection. Certain works of art in the Keithleys’ gift and promised gift are shown alongside paintings, drawings or objects from the CMA’s collection, inviting visitors to discover connections, contrasts and poetic conversations between familiar, favorite works of art and new objects from the Keithleys.

The Keithleys’ collection focuses on Impressionist, Post-Impressionist and modern European and American paintings. Among the highlights are five paintings by Pierre Bonnard; four each by Maurice Denis and Édouard Vuillard; two each by Milton Avery, Georges Braque, Gustave Caillebotte, Joan Mitchell and Félix Vallotton; and individual pictures of outstanding quality by Henri-Edmond Cross, Vilhelm Hammershøi, Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, Camille Pissarro and Andrew Wyeth. Among the works on paper are six watercolors by John Marin, five drawings by Bonnard and a spectacular pastel by Eugène Boudin. Also included in the exhibition is a selection of European and American decorative arts. The Keithleys also collected Chinese and contemporary Japanese ceramics. In the exhibition, Asian ceramics are shown alongside Western paintings and drawings to echo the harmonies created by the Keithleys, who enjoyed thoughtfully juxtaposing the works in their home.

A richly illustrated catalogue accompanies the exhibition.

All exhibitions at the Cleveland Museum of Art are underwritten by the CMA Fund for Exhibitions. Principal annual support is provided by Michael Frank in memory of Patricia Snyder. Major annual support is provided by the Womens Council of the Cleveland Museum of Art. Generous annual support is provided by an anonymous supporter, Dick Blum (deceased) and Harriet Warm, Cynthia and Dale Brogan, Dr. Ben and Julia Brouhard, Mr. and Mrs. Walter R. Chapman Jr., the Jeffery Wallace Ellis Trust in memory of Lloyd H. Ellis Jr., Leigh and Andy Fabens, the Sam J. Frankino Foundation, Janice Hammond and Edward Hemmelgarn, Carl T. Jagatich, Eva and Rudolf Linnebach, William S. and Margaret F. Lipscomb, Bill and Joyce Litzler, Carl and Lu Anne Morrison, Tim O’Brien and Breck Platner, Henry Ott-Hansen, Mr. and Mrs. Michael F. Resch, Margaret and Loyal Wilson, and Claudia C. Woods and David A. Osage.

The Cleveland Museum of Art is funded in part by residents of Cuyahoga County through a public grant from Cuyahoga Arts & Culture.

This exhibition is supported in part by the Ohio Arts Council, which receives support from the State of Ohio and the National Endowment for the Arts.

 

Tales of the City: Drawing in the Netherlands from Bosch to Bruegel
October 9, 2022, to January 8, 2023
The Kelvin and Eleanor Smith Foundation Exhibition Gallery
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The Northern Renaissance transformed daily life in the 1500s in the Netherlands (an area today encompassing Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg), brought about by the Protestant Reformation, wide-scale urbanization and the start of the Eighty Years’ War. Tales of the City: Drawing in the Netherlands from Bosch to Bruegel is a once-in-a-lifetime exhibition that introduces audiences to the highly engaging works of this era while exploring issues that remain relevant today, such as communal identity and expression, religious conflict and freedom, and the ethics and excesses of wealth. It features more than 80 rarely seen drawings from the Albertina Museum in Vienna, one of Europe’s oldest and finest collections, combined with choice examples from the CMA’s holdings.

With their various functions and relationships to other media and projects, drawings provide fascinating insight into the Netherlandish city as a place of artistic collaboration and patronage. Artists participated in the economic boom of the 1500s by adorning the city’s many churches, chapter houses and domestic spaces. They made drawings to prepare for large commissions, to transfer designs to other media and to plan civic events. Many works in the exhibition were created in conjunction with the Netherlands’ flourishing industries in stained glass, tapestries and printmaking, while others are among the first autonomous drawings in Northern Europe, meant for collectors from the newly affluent middle class.

Featured are an array of refined techniques, including lavishly colored drawings and luxury objects drawn with ink on parchment, with subjects ranging from hell scenes to mythological dramas. Two stars of the exhibition are Hieronymus Bosch’s Tree-Man, one of the most idiosyncratic drawings of the era, and Pieter Bruegel the Elder’s Sloth (Seven Deadly Sins), an essay on contemporary civic morality. Among several designs for majestic stained glass windows is a rare cartoon (full-scale drawing) measuring almost five feet tall by Antwerp artist Jan de Beer. Other notable works—seldom seen outside Europe—include portrait drawings in colored chalks by Hendrick Goltzius and a technically sophisticated pen drawing that imitates engraving by his stepson, Jacob Matham.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a major catalogue including catalogue entries and several essays by leading scholars.

Generous support is provided by the Robert Lehman Foundation. Additional support is provided by Randall J. and Virginia N. Barbato.

All exhibitions at the Cleveland Museum of Art are underwritten by the CMA Fund for Exhibitions. Principal annual support is provided by Michael Frank in memory of Patricia Snyder. Major annual support is provided by the Womens Council of the Cleveland Museum of Art. Generous annual support is provided by an anonymous supporter, Dick Blum (deceased) and Harriet Warm, Cynthia and Dale Brogan, Dr. Ben and Julia Brouhard, Mr. and Mrs. Walter R. Chapman Jr., the Jeffery Wallace Ellis Trust in memory of Lloyd H. Ellis Jr., Leigh and Andy Fabens, the Sam J. Frankino Foundation, Janice Hammond and Edward Hemmelgarn, Carl T. Jagatich, Eva and Rudolf Linnebach, Bill and Joyce Litzler, Carl and Lu Anne Morrison, Henry Ott-Hansen, Mr. and Mrs. Michael F. Resch, Margaret and Loyal Wilson, and Claudia C. Woods and David A. Osage.

The exhibition catalogue for Tales of the City: Drawing in the Netherlands from Bosch to Bruegel was produced with the generous support of the Tavolozza Foundation. 

Generous support of the exhibition symposium is provided by the Robert Lehman Foundation.

This exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

 

China through the Magnifying Glass: Masterpieces in Miniature and Detail
December 11, 2022, to February 26, 2023 
Julia and Larry Pollock Focus Gallery | Gallery 010
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Objects in miniature have mesmerized people of all cultures throughout the ages. The CMA’s Chinese collection has an extraordinarily large number of high-quality small-scale objects and miniatures from various dynasties. This exhibition focuses on China and explores the role and function of miniatures and small-scale masterpieces of craftsmanship. About 80 objects dating from ancient times to the 1800s are presented according to their respective use and function in themed sections: “Accessories and Ornaments,” “Objects of Ritual and Devotion,” “Luxury and Pride in Craftsmanship,” “the Scholar’s Desk” and “Toys, Boys and Games.” These themes question each object’s function and role in society as a way of achieving a better understanding of China’s culture and history, as well as miniatures worldwide. 

All exhibitions at the Cleveland Museum of Art are underwritten by the CMA Fund for Exhibitions. Principal annual support is provided by Michael Frank in memory of Patricia Snyder. Major annual support is provided by the Womens Council of the Cleveland Museum of Art. Generous annual support is provided by Dick Blum (deceased) and Harriet Warm, Cynthia and Dale Brogan, Dr. Ben and Julia Brouhard, Mr. and Mrs. Walter R. Chapman Jr., Janice Hammond and Edward Hemmelgarn, Carl T. Jagatich, Eva and Rudolf Linnebach, Bill and Joyce Litzler, Carl and Lu Anne Morrison, Henry Ott-Hansen, Mr. and Mrs. Michael F. Resch, Margaret and Loyal Wilson, and Claudia C. Woods and David A. Osage.

The Cleveland Museum of Art is funded in part by residents of Cuyahoga County through a public grant from Cuyahoga Arts & Culture.

This exhibition is supported in part by the Ohio Arts Council, which receives support from the State of Ohio and the National Endowment for the Arts.

 

Nineteenth-Century French Drawings from the Cleveland Museum of Art
January 20 to April 30, 2023
James and Hanna Bartlett Prints and Drawings Gallery | Gallery 101
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Drawing transformed radically in 19th-century France, expanding from a means of artistic training to an independent medium with rich potential for exploration and experimentation. This exhibition celebrates the CMA’s internationally recognized holdings of 19th-century French drawings—a cornerstone of its collection since the institution opened in 1916. Over the past century, the CMA has acquired exceptional and diverse sheets—from one with sketches made by a young Edgar Degas during his first trip to Italy to the first drawing by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec to enter an American museum collection.

The approximately 50 featured artworks explore the history of drawing in 19th-century France and chronicle the remarkable role the medium has played at the CMA. Following landmark acquisitions, across a number of decades, by such iconic artists as Honoré Daumier, Berthe Morisot and Auguste Renoir, the CMA has continued to enhance and deepen its collection of drawings. The numerous recently acquired works in this exhibition include a luminous colored pencil study by symbolist artist Alexandre Séon and a group of “noir” drawings—named for their use of varied black drawing media—by Henri Fantin-Latour, Albert-Charles Lebourg and Adolphe Appian, among others.

A richly illustrated catalogue—the first to document this collection—accompanies the exhibition, featuring new research on each of the included works and essays by leading scholars in the field.

Principal support is provided by the Getty Foundation as part of The Paper Project initiative. Major support is provided by the Wolfgang Ratjen Foundation, Liechtenstein. Additional support is provided by the Simon Family Foundation, a supporting foundation of the Jewish Federation of Cleveland.

All exhibitions at the Cleveland Museum of Art are underwritten by the CMA Fund for Exhibitions. Principal annual support is provided by Michael Frank in memory of Patricia Snyder. Major annual support is provided by the Womens Council of the Cleveland Museum of Art. Generous annual support is provided by Cynthia and Dale Brogan, Dr. Ben and Julia Brouhard, Mr. and Mrs. Walter R. Chapman Jr., Janice Hammond and Edward Hemmelgarn, Carl T. Jagatich, Eva and Rudolf Linnebach, Bill and Joyce Litzler, Carl and Lu Anne Morrison, Henry Ott-Hansen, Mr. and Mrs. Michael F. Resch, Margaret and Loyal Wilson, and Claudia C. Woods and David A. Osage.

 

The Tudors: Art and Majesty in Renaissance England
Ticketed
February 26 to May 14, 2023
The Kelvin and Eleanor Smith Foundation Exhibition Hall
Images

England under the volatile Tudor dynasty was a thriving home for the arts. An international community of artists and merchants, many of them religious refugees, navigated the high-stakes demands of royal patrons, including England’s first two reigning queens. Against the backdrop of shifting political relationships with mainland Europe, Tudor artistic patronage legitimized, promoted and stabilized a series of tumultuous reigns, from Henry VII’s seizure of the throne in 1485 to the death of his granddaughter Elizabeth I in 1603. The Tudor courts were truly cosmopolitan, boasting the work of Florentine sculptors, German painters, Flemish weavers and Europe’s best armorers, goldsmiths and printers, while also contributing to the emergence of a distinctly English style. This exhibition traces the transformation of the arts in Tudor England through more than 80 objects—including iconic portraits, spectacular tapestries, manuscripts, sculpture and armor—from both the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s collection and international lenders.

A catalogue accompanies the exhibition.

The exhibition is organized by the Cleveland Museum of Art and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, in collaboration with the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco (FAMSF). It is on view at the Met from October 10, 2022, to January 8, 2023, and at FAMSF from June 24, 2023, to September 24, 2023.

All exhibitions at the Cleveland Museum of Art are underwritten by the CMA Fund for Exhibitions. Principal annual support is provided by Michael Frank in memory of Patricia Snyder. Major annual support is provided by the Womens Council of the Cleveland Museum of Art. Generous annual support is provided by Cynthia and Dale Brogan, Dr. Ben and Julia Brouhard, Mr. and Mrs. Walter R. Chapman Jr., Janice Hammond and Edward Hemmelgarn, Carl T. Jagatich, Eva and Rudolf Linnebach, Bill and Joyce Litzler, Carl and Lu Anne Morrison, Henry Ott-Hansen, Mr. and Mrs. Michael F. Resch, Margaret and Loyal Wilson, and Claudia C. Woods and David A. Osage.

The Cleveland Museum of Art is funded in part by residents of Cuyahoga County through a public grant from Cuyahoga Arts & Culture.

This exhibition is supported in part by the Ohio Arts Council, which receives support from the State of Ohio and the National Endowment for the Arts.

 

Tilman Riemenschneider’s Saint Jerome and Late Medieval Alabaster Sculpture
March 26 to July 23, 2023
Julia and Larry Pollock Focus Gallery
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Alabaster was prized for its luster and capacity for fine details from the 14th to the 16th century particularly in Germany, the Netherlands, France and Spain. The gleaming stone was used for altarpieces and small sculptures, as well as for the tombs of wealthy princes. Despite the rich corpus of surviving works, medieval alabaster sculpture from continental Europe has not yet been highlighted by museums in Europe and North America. This exhibition seeks to shed light on this important yet under-studied topic by gathering some of the most extraordinary surviving examples of alabaster works made in Europe during the late Middle Ages. The majority of objects on view are from the CMA’s collection and allow insight into the production of alabaster sculptures in this period. Loans from North American museums complement the exhibition.

The centerpiece of the show is the CMA’s masterpiece by Tilman Riemenschneider, Saint Jerome and the Lion, produced for the Benedictine abbey church of Saint Peter in Erfurt, Germany, depicting a legend in which Jerome gently removes a thorn from a lion’s paw. The CMA’s exhibition reunites Saint Jerome with another Riemenschneider work from the same church in Erfurt, an alabaster statuette titled Virgin Mary of the Annunciation, in the collection of the Musée du Louvre. These works are exceptionally rare, as they are two of only a few extant alabaster sculptures produced by Riemenschneider; Saint Jerome is the only work in alabaster by Riemenschneider in an American museum. One of the most prolific late Gothic sculptors, Riemenschneider is renowned for his technical virtuosity and ability to convincingly portray human emotion in his elegant sculptures of religious figures. Saint Jerome and the Lion and the Louvre’s Virgin Mary exemplify Riemenschneider’s artistic ability, as well as the refinement that can be achieved with alabaster by virtue of the medium’s softness.

All exhibitions at the Cleveland Museum of Art are underwritten by the CMA Fund for Exhibitions. Principal annual support is provided by Michael Frank in memory of Patricia Snyder. Major annual support is provided by the Womens Council of the Cleveland Museum of Art. Generous annual support is provided by Cynthia and Dale Brogan, Dr. Ben and Julia Brouhard, Mr. and Mrs. Walter R. Chapman Jr., Janice Hammond and Edward Hemmelgarn, Carl T. Jagatich, Eva and Rudolf Linnebach, Carl and Lu Anne Morrison, Henry Ott-Hansen, Mr. and Mrs. Michael F. Resch, Margaret and Loyal Wilson, and Claudia C. Woods and David A. Osage.

The Cleveland Museum of Art is funded in part by residents Of Cuyahoga County through a public grant from Cuyahoga Arts & Culture.

This exhibition is supported in part by the Ohio Arts Council, which receives support from the State of Ohio and the National Endowment for the Arts.

 

A Splendid Land: Paintings from Royal Udaipur
Ticketed
June 11 to September 10, 2023
The Kelvin and Eleanor Smith Foundation Exhibition Gallery
Images

Around 1700, artists in Udaipur (a court in northwest India) began creating immersive paintings that convey the mood (bhava) of the city’s palaces, lakes, and mountains. These large paintings and their emphasis on lived experience have never been the focus of an exhibition.

With dazzling paintings on paper and cloth—many on public view for the first time—A Splendid Land reveals how artists visualized emotions, depicted places, celebrated water resources and fostered personal bonds over 200 years in the rapidly changing political and cultural landscapes of early modern South Asia.

The exhibition is organized as a journey that begins at Udaipur’s center and continues outward: first to the city, then to the countryside, and finally to the cosmos.

A Splendid Land: Paintings from Royal Udaipur is organized by the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Asian Art, in collaboration with the City Palace Museum, Udaipur, administered by the Maharana of Mewar Charitable Foundation.

All exhibitions at the Cleveland Museum of Art are underwritten by the CMA Fund for Exhibitions. Principal annual support is provided by Michael Frank in memory of Patricia Snyder. Major annual support is provided by the Womens Council of the Cleveland Museum of Art. Generous annual support is provided by Cynthia and Dale Brogan, Dr. Ben and Julia Brouhard, Mr. and Mrs. Walter R. Chapman Jr., Janice Hammond and Edward Hemmelgarn, Carl T. Jagatich, Eva and Rudolf Linnebach, Carl and Lu Anne Morrison, Henry Ott-Hansen, and Margaret and Loyal Wilson.

The Cleveland Museum of Art is funded in part by residents of Cuyahoga County through a public grant from Cuyahoga Arts & Culture.

This exhibition is supported in part by the Ohio Arts Council, which receives support from the State of Ohio and the National Endowment for the Arts.

 

Now on View

The New Black Vanguard: Photography between Art and Fashion
Ticketed
Through September 11, 2022
The Kelvin and Eleanor Smith Foundation Exhibition Gallery
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Organized by Aperture, New York, and curated by Antwaun Sargent, The New Black Vanguard: Photography between Art and Fashion features vibrant portraits and conceptual images that fuse art and fashion photography. The exhibition opens conversations around the representation of the Black body and Black lives as subject matter and challenges the idea that Blackness is homogenous. In Cleveland, the exhibition has a unique addition to the photographs on the walls: mannequins dressed in fashionable looks created by three of the stylists represented in the show. Arielle Bobb-Willis and Daniel Obasi, who work both as stylists and photographers, and stylist Jermaine Daley each produce a special look that highlights the important role played by stylists in creating the narratives that audiences consume from fashion and photography.

The New Black Vanguard reinfuses the contemporary visual vocabulary around beauty and the body with new vitality and substance. It presents new perspectives on the medium of photography and the notions of race and beauty, gender and power. Sargent selected 15 groundbreaking talents, including Tyler Mitchell, the first African American to shoot a cover for Vogue in the magazine’s 125-year history, and Awol Erizku, whose work has appeared in Vogue, GQ, the New York Times and the Museum of Modern Art. The men and women whose artworks are on view create in vastly different contexts, from New York and Johannesburg to Lagos and London. They have been featured in traditional lifestyle magazines, ad campaigns and museums, as well as on their individual social media channels.

Ticket Pricing

Adults $12; seniors, students and children ages 6 to 17 $10; children ages 5 and under and CMA members free.
The CMA recommends reserving tickets through its online platform by visiting The New Black Vanguard exhibition webpage. Tickets can also be reserved by phone at 216-421-7350 or on-site at one of the ticket desks. 

The exhibition is organized by Aperture, New York, and is curated by Antwaun Sargent.

The New Black Vanguard is made possible in part by Airbnb Magazine.

Major support is provided by PNC Bank. Generous support is provided by Donald F. and Anne T. Palmer.

All exhibitions at the Cleveland Museum of Art are underwritten by the CMA Fund for Exhibitions. Generous annual support is provided by an anonymous supporter, Dick Blum (deceased) and Harriet Warm, Dr. Ben H. and Julia Brouhard, Mr. and Mrs. Walter R. Chapman Jr., the Jeffery Wallace Ellis Trust in memory of Lloyd H. Ellis Jr., Leigh and Andy Fabens, Michael Frank in memory of Patricia Snyder, the Sam J. Frankino Foundation, Janice Hammond and Edward Hemmelgarn, Eva and Rudolf Linnebach, William S. and Margaret F. Lipscomb, Bill and Joyce Litzler, Tim O’Brien and Breck Platner, Anne H. Weil, the Womens Council of the Cleveland Museum of Art, and Claudia C. Woods and David A. Osage.

 

FRONT International 2022: Oh, Gods of Dust and Rainbows
Through October 2, 2022
Multi-venue exhibition featuring six presentations at the Cleveland Museum of Art
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For the second iteration of FRONT International: Cleveland Triennial for Contemporary Art, the Cleveland Museum of Art has organized six presentations throughout its galleries, featuring installations and performances by seven internationally acclaimed contemporary artists. The multivenue FRONT International’s Oh, Gods of Dust and Rainbows embraces art as an agent of transformation, a mode of healing and a therapeutic process. The title is an homage to the 1957 poem “Two Somewhat Different Epigrams” by Langston Hughes. A tender, brutal and provocative prayer, the poem meditates on the inseparability of joy and suffering. Expanding on Hughes’s invocation, FRONT 2022 explores how art making offers the possibility to transform and heal people—as individuals, as groups and as a society.

The exhibition features more than 100 regional, national and international artists working across painting, drawing, sculpture, textiles, ceramics, photography, video, text, performance and other media, demonstrating how aesthetic pleasure—sharing joy through movement, music, craft and color—can bridge differences between people to bring them together. Spanning over 30 sites in Cleveland, Akron and Oberlin, the exhibition suggests ways that art making can speak with power: showing people how to recognize and reimagine the invisible structures that govern contemporary life.

CMA FRONT Artists
Maria Hassabi  
Firelei Báez
Nicole Eisenman
Julie Mehretu
Yoshitomo Nara
Matt Eich
Tyler Mitchell 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FRONT exhibitions at the Cleveland Museum of Art are presented by Richard and Michelle Jeschelnig, with additional support from the Kelvin and Eleanor Smith Foundation, Fleischner Family Charitable Foundation, the Louise H. and David S. Ingalls Foundation, and the Consulate General of the Netherlands in New York.

All exhibitions at the Cleveland Museum of Art are underwritten by the CMA Fund for Exhibitions. Major annual support is provided by the Womens Council of the Cleveland Museum of Art. Generous annual support is provided by an anonymous supporter, Dick Blum (deceased) and Harriet Warm, Dr. Ben H. and Julia Brouhard, Mr. and Mrs. Walter R. Chapman Jr., the Jeffery Wallace Ellis Trust in memory of Lloyd H. Ellis Jr., Leigh and Andy Fabens, Michael Frank in memory of Patricia Snyder, the Sam J. Frankino Foundation, Janice Hammond and Edward Hemmelgarn, Eva and Rudolf Linnebach, William S. and Margaret F. Lipscomb, Bill and Joyce Litzler, Carl and Lu Anne Morrison, Henry Ott-Hansen, Tim O’Brien and Breck Platner, Mr. and Mrs. Michael F. Resch, Anne H. Weil, and Claudia C. Woods and David A. Osage.

 

Medieval Treasures from Münster Cathedral
Through August 14, 2022
Gallery 115
Images

Gold and silver reliquaries, jeweled crosses, liturgical garments and illuminated manuscripts are among the rare treasures kept in the Cathedral of Saint Paul in Münster, in northwestern Germany. Because the cathedral was the heart of both the diocese and the secular territory of the bishop, many art objects were commissioned for, or gifted to, the cathedral. For the medieval Christian, collections of relics and reliquaries held spiritual power and political clout. Many of Münster’s reliquaries, created between the 1000s and 1500s, were permanently displayed on the altar, while others were brought out only during liturgical celebrations. Medieval Treasures includes seven of these reliquaries.

All exhibitions at the Cleveland Museum of Art are underwritten by the CMA Fund for Exhibitions. Major annual support is provided by the Estate of Dolores B. Comey and Bill and Joyce Litzler, with generous annual funding from Mr. and Mrs. Walter R. Chapman Jr., the Jeffery Wallace Ellis Trust in memory of Lloyd H. Ellis Jr., Ms. Arlene Monroe Holden, Eva and Rudolf Linnebach, William S. and Margaret F. Lipscomb, Tim O’Brien and Breck Platner, the Womens Council of the Cleveland Museum of Art, and Claudia C. Woods and David A. Osage.

The Cleveland Museum of Art is funded in part by residents of Cuyahoga County through a public grant from Cuyahoga Arts & Culture.

This exhibition was supported in part by the Ohio Arts Council, which receives support from the State of Ohio and the National Endowment for the Arts.

 

Martial Art of India
Through August 21, 2022
Indian Painting Gallery | Gallery 242B
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Scenes of battles and portraits of soldiers in Indian painting include both historical and mythical, real and idealized images—and often in combination. This selection of paintings from the museum’s permanent collection reveals a range of depictions, from historical documents to illustrations of epic tales.

 

Japan’s Floating World
日本の浮世
Through October 9, 2022
Kelvin and Eleanor Smith Foundation Japanese Art Galleries | Galleries 235A and B
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A significant number of paintings, prints and decorative arts made in Japan from the mid-1700s to mid-1800s captured artists’ responses to urban sex and entertainment districts unofficially known as the ukiyo (浮世), or “floating world.” Images of courtesans and musicians vie with those of Kabuki actors and a sumo wrestler for attention in the spring installation (April 8 to July 10), while prints of boating parties on the Sumida River feature in the summer installation (July 12 to October 2).

 

Creating Urgency: Modern and Contemporary Korean Art
Through October 23, 2022
Korea Foundation Gallery | Gallery 236
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The selected works dating from the early 1960s to the 2010s spark a stimulating discussion about contemporary Korean artists and their expressive language of defining diasporic artistic identities. Korean-born French painter Ungno Lee (1904–1989) reimagined traditional Korean ink painting and its conventional methods through his exploration of European abstraction. Berlin-based Korean artist Haegue Yang (b. 1971), on the other hand, invites the audience to critically explore issues of identity, migration and displacement. Along with Yang’s multimedia installation, a monumental ink painting titled Person by Suh Se Ok makes its debut following its acquisition in 2021.

 

Escaping to a Better World: Eccentrics and Immortals in Chinese Art
Through November 6, 2022
Clara T. Rankin Galleries of Chinese Art | Gallery 240A
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In times of a pandemic, migration crises and frequent natural disasters, the theme of “Escaping to a Better World” may resonate with many visitors. In fact, this idea has long been part of China’s culture, embedded in the country’s religious and philosophical thinking. China’s legendary eccentrics and immortals often exhibit unconventional appearances and behaviors, expressing supernatural power and a rejection of everyday norms. By doing this, they embody the longing for an ideal world.

This installation presents paintings, porcelain and metalwork, all media in which these popular figures and their stories were depicted throughout all ages, including today.

 

Contemporary Installation
Toby’s Galleries for Contemporary Art | Galleries 229A and C
Paula and Eugene Stevens Gallery | Gallery 229B
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This installation invites visitors to experience new conversations among works created after 1960 by a diverse range of artists. The Cleveland Museum of Art is honored to feature Kerry James Marshall’s masterpiece Bang (1994), on loan from the Progressive Corporation, in conversation with works from the museum’s collection—including recent acquisitions, such as Rashid Johnson’s Standing Broken Men (2021) and Kambui Olujimi’s Italo (2021), as well as longtime CMA favorites, like Andy Warhol’s Marilyn x 100 (1962). Other highlights of the installation are recently acquired sculptures by Melvin Edwards, a radiant textile by Olga de Amaral that has not been exhibited for many years, and special private collection loans by Chris Ofili and Elias Sime. Together, the works on view demonstrate the various perspectives, backgrounds and identities that animate contemporary art.

 

Native North America Installation
Through December 4, 2022
Sarah P. and William R. Robertson Gallery | Gallery 231
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Works from the permanent collection newly on display in the Native North American gallery include a group of objects from the Great Plains—a child’s beaded cradle; a woman’s hair-pipe necklace, one of the most memorable of Plains ornaments; and several beaded or painted bags that served varied purposes. A basket rotation features creations that Timbisha Shoshone (Panamint) weavers of California’s Death Valley made for the early 20th-century collector’s market; most dramatic are three fine, large presentation bowls modeled on Native food service bowls. Finally, for the first time in at least 20 years, two works by contemporary Inuit artists of the Canadian Arctic make an appearance. One is a 1972 stonecut print by Alec (Peter) Aliknak Banksland, a founding member of the Holman Eskimo Arts Cooperative, now the Ulukhaktok Arts Centre in Ulukhaktok, Canada.

 

Ancient Andean Textiles
Through December 4, 2022
Jon A. Lindseth and Virginia M. Lindseth, PhD, Galleries of the Ancient Americas | Gallery 232
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The textiles in the current installation from the permanent collection represent several different civilizations that flourished in the ancient Andes, today Peru and parts of adjacent countries. Though unrelated by cultural affiliation, they are unified by being special in some way, whether through rarity, complexity of execution or luxuriousness of materials. The centerpiece of the display is a unique cloth that experts regard as one of the greatest paintings to survive from South American antiquity. One of the museum’s masterpieces, it was created by an artist of the Nasca culture (100 BC–AD 650) and depicts a procession of figures who may represent humans dressed in the guises of supernatural beings thought to control nature’s fertility. Other textiles in the installation include a panel covered in the radiant feathers of the blue-and-yellow macaw, made by artists of the Wari Empire (600–1000) and several fragments that are rare survivors of catastrophic rains that destroyed much of the Moche culture’s (AD 200–850) textile legacy.

 

Arts of Africa: Gallery Rotation
Through December 18, 2022
Galleries 108A, B and C
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Seventeen rarely seen or newly acquired works have been installed in the African arts galleries. These 19th- to 21st-century works from northern, central, western and southern Africa support continuing efforts to broaden the scope of African arts on view at the CMA.

Marking the first inclusion of a northern African artist in the CMA’s African arts gallery, digitally carved alabaster tablets by contemporary Algerian artist Rachid Koraïchi make their debut. Carved by acclaimed Yorùbá sculptor Duga of Mẹkọ (c. 1880–1960), twinned Gẹ̀lẹ̀dẹ́ society masks with innovative moving parts are on view, while a Yorùbá-style vessel of a goose is displayed with new insights into its painted plumage.

Several works acquired during the CMA’s first 25 years show the long institutional history of African arts. These include a central African elite’s luxurious wooden sandals and a Zimbabwean ceremonial axe with ties to both the historical Great Zimbabwe and modern independence movements. Among these early acquisitions are pieces made by the royal Asante goldsmiths’ guild; these visitor favorites are reinstalled with new texts regarding their spiritual meaning and artists’ techniques.

 

Cycles of Life: The Four Seasons Tapestries
Through February 19, 2023
Arlene M. and Arthur S. Holden Textile Gallery | Gallery 234
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Cycles of Life: The Four Seasons Tapestries offers visitors an in-depth look at a rare, complete set of tapestries in the museum’s collection that has not been displayed since 1953 because of the tapestries’ fragile condition. Each tapestry depicts seasonal activities: fishing and gardening (Spring), grain harvesting (Summer), wine making (Autumn) and ice skating (Winter). When viewed together, the tapestries represent a full cycle of life. Taking the “four seasons” motif as inspiration, this exhibition tells the story of the life of the tapestries through four themes—their initial design and production, subsequent reproduction and alteration, later acquisition by the museum and recent conservation treatment by tapestry conservation specialists in Belgium, at Royal Manufacturers De Wit, under the supervision of the CMA’s textile conservator. The exhibition also offers an in-depth look at the difficult craft of tapestry conservation, including its ethics, techniques and concerns.

Art historical research for this exhibition was a collaboration with Case Western Reserve University graduate students in the museum's joint art history graduate program.

Generous support is provided by the Thompson Family Foundation.

All exhibitions at the Cleveland Museum of Art are underwritten by the CMA Fund for Exhibitions. Generous annual support is provided by an anonymous supporter, Dick Blum (deceased) and Harriet Warm, Dr. Ben H. and Julia Brouhard, Mr. and Mrs. Walter R. Chapman Jr., the Jeffery Wallace Ellis Trust in memory of Lloyd H. Ellis Jr., Leigh and Andy Fabens, Michael Frank in memory of Patricia Snyder, the Sam J. Frankino Foundation, Janice Hammond and Edward Hemmelgarn, Eva and Rudolf Linnebach, William S. and Margaret F. Lipscomb, Tim O’Brien and Breck Platner, Anne H. Weil and the Womens Council of the Cleveland Museum of Art.

The conservation of the Four Seasons tapestries was made possible with support from Emma Lincoln (deceased).

 

Additional Information

The CDC updated its guidelines regarding the need to wear face coverings in public settings for protection against COVID-19. The CMA recommends but no longer requires visitors to wear a face covering inside the building.

The CMA’s current hours of operation are Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Wednesday and Friday, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. The museum is closed Mondays. Updated hours will be announced as decided. Visit cma.org to stay up to date on this information.

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About the Cleveland Museum of Art

The Cleveland Museum of Art is renowned for the quality and breadth of its collection, which includes more than 63,000 artworks and spans 6,000 years of achievement in the arts. The museum is a significant international forum for exhibitions, scholarship and performing arts and is a leader in digital innovations. One of the top comprehensive art museums in the nation, recognized for its award-winning Open Access program and free of charge to all, the Cleveland Museum of Art is located in the University Circle neighborhood.

The museum is supported in part by residents of Cuyahoga County through a public grant from Cuyahoga Arts & Culture and made possible in part by the Ohio Arts Council (OAC), which receives support from the State of Ohio and the National Endowment for the Arts. The OAC is a state agency that funds and supports quality arts experiences to strengthen Ohio communities culturally, educationally and economically. For more information about the museum and its holdings, programs and events, call 888-CMA-0033 or visit cma.org.