A
News Release
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

October 2021 On-Site Exhibitions and Events Listings for the Cleveland Museum of Art

Thursday, September 30, 2021

Kelley Notaro Schreiber

The Cleveland Museum of Art
knotaro [at] clevelandart.org
216-707-6898

Exhibitions

  • Opening this month!
    Picturing Motherhood Now
    October 16, 2021, to March 13, 2022
    The Kelvin and Eleanor Smith Foundation Exhibition Gallery

    Responding to our time, Picturing Motherhood Now brings together works by a diverse range of contemporary artists who reimagine the possibilities for representing motherhood. The exhibition challenges familiar archetypes of motherhood, construing it as a multivalent term. The artists in the exhibition use motherhood as a lens through which to examine contemporary social issues—the changing definitions of family and gender, the histories and afterlives of slavery, the legacies of migration and the preservation of matrilineal Indigenous cultures. The exhibition focuses on art made in the past two decades, while integrating work by significant pioneers to narrate an intergenerational and evolving story of motherhood.

    Exhibition Tickets
    Adults $12; seniors, college students with ID and children ages 12 to 17 $10; member guests $6; children ages 11 and under and CMA members FREE.

    Combination Tickets
    *Includes admission to Revealing Krishna: Journey to Cambodia’s Sacred Mountain, on view November 14, 2021, through January 30, 2022.

    Adults $25; seniors, college students with ID and children ages 12 to 17 $20; member guests $10; children ages 11 and under and CMA members FREE.

    Groups of 10 or more people may reserve tickets to Picturing Motherhood Now for $10 per person, or combination tickets to Picturing Motherhood Now and Revealing Krishna for $20 per person. No guided tours will be offered. To book a group, contact groupsales [at] clevelandart.org.

    Reserve tickets online at cma.org, at the box office or by calling 216-421-7350.

    Major support is provided in memory of Myrlin von Glahn. Additional support is provided by Cathy Lincoln. Generous support is provided by the Cleveland Society for Contemporary Art, and Joanne Cohen and Morris Wheeler.

    This project is supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts.

    All exhibitions at the Cleveland Museum of Art are underwritten by the CMA Fund for Exhibitions. Generous annual support is provided by Mr. and Mrs. Walter R. Chapman Jr., the Jeffery Wallace Ellis Trust in memory of Lloyd H. Ellis Jr., Janice Hammond and Edward Hemmelgarn, Eva and Rudolf Linnebach, William S. and Margaret F. Lipscomb, Tim O’Brien and Breck Platner, Anne H. Weil, and the Womens Council of the Cleveland Museum of Art.


  • Opening this month!
    Stories in Japanese Art
    October 8, 2021, to April 10, 2022
    Kelvin and Eleanor Smith Foundation Japanese Art Galleries | Gallery 235A

    Japan is known today for anime and manga (animations and graphic novels) and has a long tradition of storytelling in the visual arts. This gallery explores Japanese narrative art with diverse examples from the 1300s to the 1900s. The majority of the works include text elements, from a chapter title done in raised gold lacquer on a writing box to poems or dialogue inscribed in ink next to figures on handscroll fragments. These works demonstrate some of the different ways Japanese artists have combined visual imagery with written stories over the centuries.


  • Opening this month!
    Popular Art from Early Modern Korea
    October 29, 2021, to April 24, 2022
    Korea Foundation Gallery | Gallery 236

    In the 1960s, practitioners of Pop Art looked toward everyday commodities and commercial images for inspiration. Such an artistic spirit that challenged the rigid concept between high- and lowbrow arts in fact had long existed in Korean art, flourishing in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Rendered in dazzling colors, Korean still-life paintings called chaekgeori (pronounced check-oh-ree), for example, are replete with mass-produced utilitarian items and trendy luxuries. Polychrome folding screens, such as chaekgeori, often complemented familial festivities and reunions, beyond simply furnishing the living space of middle-class households. Blue-and-white porcelain, which features the abundant use of expensive cobalt blue and floral decor, is another artistic expression drawn from the emerging consumerism in early modern Korea. By the late 1800s, Korean art was becoming more inclusive and diverse, no longer exclusively for the elites.


  • A New York Minute: Street Photography, 1920–1950
    Through November 7, 2021
    Mark Schwartz and Bettina Katz Photography Gallery

    Street photography—spontaneous images of everyday life captured in public places—blossomed in New York City during the first half of the 20th century. This genre of photography was heir to the slightly earlier tradition of urban realism in painting and printmaking, as seen in the complementary exhibition Ashcan School Prints and the American City, 1900–1940, on view in the James and Hanna Bartlett Prints and Drawings Gallery. Both movements turned to depictions of the everyday activities of urban dwellers to explore the radical demographic, social and economic shifts then transforming the city.

    All exhibitions at the Cleveland Museum of Art are underwritten by the CMA Fund for Exhibitions. Major annual support is provided by Bill and Joyce Litzler, with generous annual funding from Mr. and Mrs. Walter R. Chapman Jr., the Jeffery Wallace Ellis Trust in memory of Lloyd H. Ellis Jr., Janice Hammond and Edward Hemmelgarn, Ms. Arlene Monroe Holden, Eva and Rudolf Linnebach, William S. and Margaret F. Lipscomb, Tim O’Brien and Breck Platner, the Womens Council of the Cleveland Museum of Art, and Claudia Woods and David Osage.

    The Cleveland Museum of Art is funded in part by residents of Cuyahoga County through a public grant from Cuyahoga Arts & Culture.

    This exhibition was supported in part by the Ohio Arts Council, which receives support from the State of Ohio and the National Endowment for the Arts.


  • A New York Minute: Street Photography, 1920–1950
    Through November 7, 2021
    Mark Schwartz and Bettina Katz Photography Gallery

    Street photography—spontaneous images of everyday life captured in public places—blossomed in New York City during the first half of the 20th century. This genre of photography was heir to the slightly earlier tradition of urban realism in painting and printmaking, as seen in the complementary exhibition Ashcan School Prints and the American City, 1900–1940, on view in the James and Hanna Bartlett Prints and Drawings Gallery. Both movements turned to depictions of the everyday activities of urban dwellers to explore the radical demographic, social and economic shifts then transforming the city.

    All exhibitions at the Cleveland Museum of Art are underwritten by the CMA Fund for Exhibitions. Major annual support is provided by Bill and Joyce Litzler, with generous annual funding from Mr. and Mrs. Walter R. Chapman Jr., the Jeffery Wallace Ellis Trust in memory of Lloyd H. Ellis Jr., Janice Hammond and Edward Hemmelgarn, Ms. Arlene Monroe Holden, Eva and Rudolf Linnebach, William S. and Margaret F. Lipscomb, Tim O’Brien and Breck Platner, the Womens Council of the Cleveland Museum of Art, and Claudia Woods and David Osage.

    The Cleveland Museum of Art is funded in part by residents of Cuyahoga County through a public grant from Cuyahoga Arts & Culture.

    This exhibition was supported in part by the Ohio Arts Council, which receives support from the State of Ohio and the National Endowment for the Arts.


  • From Caves to Tombs: Chinese Pictorial Rubbings from Stone Reliefs (從石窟到墓祠—石刻拓片)
    Through November 14, 2021
    Gallery 240A

    The exhibition explores the tradition of making and mounting ink rubbings from stone reliefs, practiced in China at least since the 500s. Before high-resolution color photography was available, life-size rubbings taken from ancient sites and cultural relics in China played an important role as primary source and study material. This display celebrates the recent conservation of two monumental rubbings from the Buddhist caves of Longmen in central China.


  • Ashcan School Prints and the American City, 1900–1940
    Through December 26, 2021
    James and Hanna Bartlett Prints and Drawings Gallery

    Ashcan School Prints and the American City, 1900–1940 presents prints of city life made by urban realists during a time of rapid demographic, social and economic transformation. With New York City as an epicenter of change—packed with vibrant new communities of immigrants from Europe and Latin American countries, and Black Southerners who had migrated north—artists responded to the everyday lives and experiences of city dwellers, incorporating advertising and mass media techniques into their depictions of the lower classes, immigrants, working women and social elites alike.  

    Principal support is provided by the Print Club of Cleveland.

    All exhibitions at the Cleveland Museum of Art are underwritten by the CMA Fund for Exhibitions. Major annual support is provided by Bill and Joyce Litzler, with generous annual funding from Mr. and Mrs. Walter R. Chapman Jr., the Jeffery Wallace Ellis Trust in memory of Lloyd H. Ellis Jr., Janice Hammond and Edward Hemmelgarn, Ms. Arlene Monroe Holden, Eva and Rudolf Linnebach, William S. and Margaret F. Lipscomb, Tim O’Brien and Breck Platner, the Womens Council of the Cleveland Museum of Art, and Claudia Woods and David Osage.


  • Fashioning Identity: Mola Textiles of Panamá
    Through January 9, 2022
    Arlene M. and Arthur S. Holden Textile Gallery

    The exhibition explores the mola, a hand-sewn cotton blouse and a key component of traditional dress among the Guna women of Panamá, as both a cultural marker and the product of an artistic tradition. It demonstrates the important role women artists play in the construction of social identity.

    All exhibitions at the Cleveland Museum of Art are underwritten by the CMA Fund for Exhibitions. Major annual support is provided by the Estate of Dolores B. Comey and Bill and Joyce Litzler, with generous annual funding from Mr. and Mrs. Walter R. Chapman Jr., the Jeffery Wallace Ellis Trust in memory of Lloyd H. Ellis Jr., Ms. Arlene Monroe Holden, Eva and Rudolf Linnebach, William S. and Margaret F. Lipscomb, Tim O’Brien and Breck Platner, the Womens Council of the Cleveland Museum of Art, and Claudia Woods and David Osage.

    The Cleveland Museum of Art is funded in part by residents of Cuyahoga County through a public grant from Cuyahoga Arts & Culture.

    This exhibition was supported in part by the Ohio Arts Council, which receives support from the State of Ohio and the National Endowment for the Arts.


  • Collecting Dreams: Odilon Redon
    Through January 23, 2022
    Julia and Larry Pollock Focus Gallery

    Odilon Redon (1840–1916) was known as “the prince of mysterious dreams” for creating paintings, drawings and prints that blend fantasy, literature and the subconscious. Collecting Dreams: Odilon Redon celebrates the Cleveland Museum of Art’s exceptional holdings by Redon, including the newly acquired charcoal drawing Quasimodo, on view for the first time. The exhibition reveals the legacy of Redon in Cleveland and introduces the phases of his career and work.

    All exhibitions at the Cleveland Museum of Art are underwritten by the CMA Fund for Exhibitions. Generous annual support is provided by Mr. and Mrs. Walter R. Chapman Jr., the Jeffery Wallace Ellis Trust in memory of Lloyd H. Ellis Jr., Janice Hammond and Edward Hemmelgarn, William S. and Margaret F. Lipscomb, Anne H. Weil, and the Womens Council of the Cleveland Museum of Art.

    The Cleveland Museum of Art is funded in part by residents of Cuyahoga County through a public grant from Cuyahoga Arts & Culture.

    This exhibition was supported in part by the Ohio Arts Council, which receives support from the State of Ohio and the National Endowment for the Arts.


  • Art of the Islamic World
    Through May 31, 2022
    Gallery 116

    Artwork from the Islamic world is as diverse and vibrant as the peoples who produced it. The objects presented in this gallery were created during the 8th through 19th centuries, a period of great cultural and geographic expansion. As a result, these works represent a vast area including Spain, North Africa, the Middle East and Central Asia. While these pieces originate within the Islamic world, they reflect the unique artistic and cultural traditions of disparate regions.


  • Medieval Treasures from Münster Cathedral
    Through August 14, 2022
    Gallery 115

    Gold and silver reliquaries, jeweled crosses, liturgical garments and illuminated manuscripts are among the rare treasures kept in the Cathedral of Saint Paul in Münster, in northwestern Germany. Because the cathedral was the heart of both the diocese and the secular territory of the bishop, many art objects were commissioned for, or gifted to, the cathedral. For the medieval Christian, collections of relics and reliquaries held spiritual power and political clout. Many of Münster’s reliquaries, created between the 1000s and 1500s, were permanently displayed on the altar, while others were brought out only during liturgical celebrations. Medieval Treasures includes eight of these reliquaries.

    All exhibitions at the Cleveland Museum of Art are underwritten by the CMA Fund for Exhibitions. Major annual support is provided by the Estate of Dolores B. Comey and Bill and Joyce Litzler, with generous annual funding from Mr. and Mrs. Walter R. Chapman Jr., the Jeffery Wallace Ellis Trust in memory of Lloyd H. Ellis Jr., Ms. Arlene Monroe Holden, Eva and Rudolf Linnebach, William S. and Margaret F. Lipscomb, Tim O’Brien and Breck Platner, the Womens Council of the Cleveland Museum of Art, and Claudia Woods and David Osage.

    The Cleveland Museum of Art is funded in part by residents of Cuyahoga County through a public grant from Cuyahoga Arts & Culture.

    This exhibition is supported in part by the Ohio Arts Council, which receives support from the State of Ohio and the National Endowment for the Arts.


  • Contemporary Art Reinstallation
    Betty and Max Ratner Gallery | Contemporary Corridor 224A
    Toby’s Gallery for Contemporary Art | Galleries 229A, 229C
    Paula and Eugene Stevens Gallery | Gallery 229B
    These galleries fall within the S. Mueller Family Galleries of Contemporary Art.

    The reimagined galleries focus on the careers of women artists and artists of color and present fresh conversations among artworks. Spanning the past six decades, the contemporary reinstallation carries forward in time stories whose beginnings are told throughout the CMA’s collection.

    The reinstallation of these galleries is made possible with principal support provided by the Sandy and Sally Cutler Strategic Opportunities Fund.

Special On-site Programs and Events

  • Lunchtime Lecture: Dreaming with Odilon Redon
    Tuesday, October 5, noon
    Morley Family Lecture Hall
    FREE; ticket required

    Come to the CMA for a quick bite of art history. Every first Tuesday of each month, join curators and other museum staff for 30-minute talks on objects currently on display in the museum galleries.

    Britany Salsbury, associate curator of prints and drawings, introduces visitors to the enigmatic and imaginative world of late 19th-century French artist Odilon Redon. Highlighting works on view in the exhibition Collecting Dreams: Odilon Redon, Salsbury discusses the artist’s paintings, drawings and prints—that mine fantasy, literature and the subconscious for inspiration—and their important place within the CMA’s history.


  • Fine Print Fair
    Friday, October 8, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
    Saturday–Sunday, October 9–10, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
    Ames Family Atrium
    FREE

    Enjoy Cleveland’s most comprehensive print marketplace, featuring 15 dealers offering prints and drawings spanning five centuries, with collecting opportunities for everyone from novice enthusiasts to seasoned collectors. The fair also features print and papermaking demonstrations.

    • Collector’s Night
      Thursday, October 7, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
      Visit the Print Club of Cleveland’s website or call 216-707-2669 to purchase tickets.

      Attendees have an opportunity to mingle and shop with fellow print enthusiasts and dealers while enjoying small bites and an open bar.


  • Special members-only event!
    Fall Members Party
    Thursday, October 14, 6 to 8:30 p.m.
    Free for members. Become a CMA member.
    Advance tickets are required. Reserve tickets here or call 216-421-7350.

    Enjoy a socially distanced, festive fall celebration, thanking members who sustain the museum’s commitment to making great art free for everyone.

    Preview the fall exhibition Picturing Motherhood Now and explore the 2021 reinstallations of the S. Mueller Family Galleries of Contemporary Art and the Islamic gallery.

    Also view the museum’s current exhibitions:

    The event includes a cash bar with specialty cocktail and complimentary parking.
    One ticket per friend level membership; two for partner level and above.


  • Noir: Writing Inspired by Odilon Redon
    Wednesday, October 27, 7 p.m.
    Morley Lecture Hall
    FREE; ticket required

    Celebrate Halloween by spending an eerie evening at the CMA with Literary Cleveland.

    Enjoy readings of dark, fantastic, suspenseful or spooky writing inspired by the visionary art of Odilon Redon, whose strangely imaginative prints and drawings are on view in the exhibition Collecting Dreams: Odilon Redon.

    Open Call: If you are interested in participating, Literary Cleveland and the CMA are accepting submissions through October 10. Submit your writing here.

On-site Collection Tours

  • Guided Tours
    Tuesday to Sunday, 1 and 1:30 p.m.
    FREE; ticket required

    Join a public tour to learn new perspectives and enjoy great storytelling about the works in the museum’s collections. Tours depart from the information desk in the Ames Family Atrium. Tickets may be reserved at cma.org or on-site at the ticket desk. Tours are limited to 15 participants per group.

Community Arts Center On-site Activity

  • Together We Are Better
    All month long
    FREE
    The Community Arts Center, 2937 West 25th Street, Cleveland, OH 44113
    Free parking in the lot off Castle Ave.

    Celebrate Hispanic/Latinx Heritage Month with a collaborative art-making project inspired by Latinx artists in the collection and in the community.

    Juntos Somos Mejores
    Celebramos el mes de la Herencia Hispana / Latinx con un proyecto colaborativo de arte, inspirado por artistas Latinx en la colección y en la comunidad.

Additional Information

ARTLENS Gallery—a multifaceted, innovative experience that allows you, your family and friends to look closer, dive deeper and have fun discovering the museum’s collection using award-winning digital technology—is now open.

The museum is gradually reintroducing on-site programs. For a current list of offerings, visit the “Learn” section of the website.

The museum’s hours of operation are Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Wednesday and Friday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. The museum is closed on Mondays.

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About the Cleveland Museum of Art

The Cleveland Museum of Art is renowned for the quality and breadth of its collection, which includes more than 63,000 artworks and spans 6,000 years of achievement in the arts. The museum is a significant international forum for exhibitions, scholarship and performing arts and is a leader in digital innovations. One of the top comprehensive art museums in the nation, recognized for its award-winning Open Access program and free of charge to all, the Cleveland Museum of Art is located in the University Circle neighborhood.

The museum is supported in part by residents of Cuyahoga County through a public grant from Cuyahoga Arts & Culture and made possible in part by the Ohio Arts Council (OAC), which receives support from the State of Ohio and the National Endowment for the Arts. The OAC is a state agency that funds and supports quality arts experiences to strengthen Ohio communities culturally, educationally and economically. For more information about the museum and its holdings, programs and events, call 888-CMA-0033 or visit cma.org.