Jan 29, 2018
Jan 29, 2018
Jan 29, 2018
Jan 29, 2018
Jan 29, 2018
Jan 29, 2018
Jan 29, 2018
Jan 29, 2018

Lady Holding a Vase

Lady Holding a Vase

1100s–1200s

Stoneware with slip decoration, Cizhou ware

Overall: 19.7 x 9.5 cm (7 3/4 x 3 3/4 in.)

John L. Severance Fund 1957.56

Did you know?

This hollow stoneware figure of a woman has firing hole visible at the bottom.

Description

The Cizhou ware kilns never produced for the imperial court, but made potted utensils needed in daily life. They also fired ceramic figurines, which are believed to have been used as toys.

The maid or palace lady here holds a long-necked vase of a type that watered flowers. The figurine, perhaps made as a toy for a girl, was molded in clay and covered with a white slip and transparent glaze, over which some colors in red, green, and ocher were applied. Cizhou kiln potters were one of the first in China who applied overglaze enamel-like colors on glazed, high-fired ceramics.

See also

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