Skip to Main Content
Tags for: Sicily: Art and Invention Between Greece and Rome
  • Special Exhibition
Statue of a Youth (The Mozia Charioteer), 470–460 BC.

Statue of a Youth (The Mozia Charioteer) (detail), 470–460 BC. Sikeliote (Sicilian Greek). Marble; 181 x 40 cm. Courtesy of the Servizio Parco archeologico e ambientale presso le isole dello Stagnone e delle aree archeologiche di Marsala e dei Comuni limitrofi–Museo Archeologico Baglio Anselmi. By permission of the Regione Siciliana, Assessorato dei Beni Culturali e dell’Identità Siciliana. Dipartimento dei Beni Culturali e dell’Identità Siciliana. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

Sicily: Art and Invention Between Greece and Rome

Sunday, September 29, 2013–Sunday, January 5, 2014
Location:  003 Special Exhibition Hall
The Kelvin and Eleanor Smith Foundation Exhibition Hall

About The Exhibition

Sicily: Art and Invention Between Greece and Rome presents masterpieces of art from ancient Sicily, an island crossroads that forged a distinctive Hellenic identity. Occupying a pivotal position in Mediterranean history, former Greek colonies such as Syracuse, Gela, Akragas, and Selinos emerged as wealthy city-states, where innovation and experimentation flourished. This exhibition celebrates Sicilian culture of the fifth to third centuries BC, when its art, architecture, theater, poetry, philosophy, and science left an original and enduring stamp on both mainland Greece and Rome. Over 150 objects bear witness to the military and athletic victories, religious and civic rituals, opulent lifestyles, and intellectual attainments that shaped the western Greek world.

 

Sicily: Art and Invention Between Greece and Rome has been co-organized by the J. Paul Getty Museum and the Cleveland Museum of Art, in association with the Assessorato dei Beni Culturali e dell'Identità Siciliana. It celebrates 2013 as the Year of Italian Culture in the United States, an initiative of the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, realized under the leadership of the President of the Republic of Italy.

 

Support for the exhibition provided by James E. and Elizabeth J. Ferrell.

 

The Cleveland Museum of Art is generously funded by Cuyahoga County residents through Cuyahoga Arts and Culture. The Ohio Arts Council helped fund this exhibition with state tax dollars to encourage economic growth, educational excellence, and cultural enrichment for all Ohioans.

 

Image
   
Image
2013 Year of Italian Culture

 


Sponsored by:

Image
Glidden
   
Image
PNC Bank