The Cleveland Museum of Art

Collection Online as of July 14, 2024

Pharmacy Jar (Albarello)

Pharmacy Jar (Albarello)

c. 1475–80

Did You Know?

At various points in history, medicinal peony compounds have been prescribed for dizziness, weakness, hysteria, jaundice, and kidney stones.

Description

Storage jars that lined the shelves of Renaissance pharmacies often held medicinal herbs, spices, and ointments. Their shape made them easy to grasp while the flared lip allowed apothecaries to seal off the contents with parchment or cloth secured by a string. A scroll on the back of this vessel indicates that it may have once held a peony compound.
  • Kurt Glogowski. (Frederic A. Stern, New York).
  • The Cleveland Museum of Art. The Cleveland Museum of Art Handbook. Cleveland, OH: The Cleveland Museum of Art, 1958. Mentioned and Reproduced: cat. no. 219 archive.org
    The Cleveland Museum of Art. Handbook of the Cleveland Museum of Art/1966. Cleveland, OH: The Cleveland Museum of Art, 1966. Reproduced: p. 85 archive.org
    The Cleveland Museum of Art. Handbook of the Cleveland Museum of Art/1969. Cleveland, OH: The Cleveland Museum of Art, 1969. Reproduced: p. 85 archive.org
    Cole, Bruce. Italian Maiolica from Midwestern Collections. Bloomington: Indiana University Art Museum, 1977.
    Published as: Drug Pot Reproduced: p. 34; Mentioned: p. 35, cat. no. 10
    The Cleveland Museum of Art. Handbook of the Cleveland Museum of Art/1978. Cleveland, OH: The Cleveland Museum of Art, 1978. Reproduced: p. 96 archive.org
  • Italian Majolica from Midwestern Collections. Indiana University Art Museum, Bloomington, IN (organizer) (September 4-October 8, 1977).
    Florence and the Arts: Five Centuries of Patronage. The Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, OH (organizer) (July 13-September 19, 1971).
  • {{cite web|title=Pharmacy Jar (Albarello)|url=false|author=|year=c. 1475–80|access-date=14 July 2024|publisher=Cleveland Museum of Art}}

Source URL:

https://www.clevelandart.org/art/1941.550