The Cleveland Museum of Art

Collection Online as of March 3, 2024

Woman with Red Hair and Green Eyes (The Sin)

Woman with Red Hair and Green Eyes (The Sin)

1901
(Norwegian, 1863–1944)
Sheet: 77.7 x 49.2 cm (30 9/16 x 19 3/8 in.); Image: 69.8 x 40.2 cm (27 1/2 x 15 13/16 in.)
Catalogue raisonné: Schiefler 142
Location: not on view

Did You Know?

Edvard Munch often used red hair in his paintings, drawings, and prints as a symbol of sexuality.

Description

The fatal women and embracing couples in Picasso’s art of the early 1900s exhibit striking affinities with the same themes in the prints of Norwegian symbolist Edvard Munch. Munch’s paintings and prints were widely circulated in Paris, shown at exhibitions, and available through dealers and fellow artists. Long hair as a key symbol of the fatal woman’s sexual allure is a recurrent theme in Munch’s art, as evident in this lithograph of 1900.
  • The Year in Review for 1983. The Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, OH (organizer) (February 22-April 8, 1984).
    Printing in Color. The Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, OH (organizer) (September 10-November 17, 1985).
    Monet to Dalí: Modern Masters from the Cleveland Museum of Art. Seoul Art Center, South Korea (December 22, 2006-March 28, 2007); Seoul Olympic Museum of Art, South Korea (April 7-May 20, 2007); The Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, OH (organizer) (October 21, 2007-January 13, 2008).
    Picasso and the Mysteries of Life: La Vie. The Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, OH (organizer) (December 12, 2012-April 21, 2013).
    CMA (organizer). Seoul Arts Center, Seoul, Korea: Dec. 18, 2006 - March 31, 2007; Seoul Olympic Museum of Art, Seoul, Korea: Apr. 7 - May 20, 2007: "Modern Masters from the Cleveland Museum of Art"
  • {{cite web|title=Woman with Red Hair and Green Eyes (The Sin)|url=false|author=Edvard Munch|year=1901|access-date=03 March 2024|publisher=Cleveland Museum of Art}}

Source URL:

https://www.clevelandart.org/art/1983.185