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Ravana’s sister Shurpanakha complains that Lakshmana cut off her nose and ears, from Chapter 31 of the Aranya Kanda (Book of the Forest) of a “Shangri” Ramayana (Rama’s Journey)

c. 1690–1710
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Overall: 21.6 x 31.8 cm (8 1/2 x 12 1/2 in.); Painting: 18.4 x 28.9 cm (7 1/4 x 11 3/8 in.)
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Location: not on view

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Did You Know?

The Ramayana of Valmiki describes Shurpanakha as hideous, misshapen, and potbellied with hair the color of copper.

Description

The golden island city of Lanka, inhabited by demons, is ruled by their ten-headed king Ravana, shown at right wielding a different weapon in each of his 20 hands. At the center of the composition, Ravana’s red-haired sister laments that Rama and his brother Lakshmana spurned her advances and humiliated her. To avenge his sister’s mutilation, and intrigued by reports of Sita’s beauty, Ravana decides to abduct Sita and claim her for himself.

Gold leaf makes the ramparts and turrets of Lanka glimmer splendidly, a sharp contrast to the dreadful residents.
Ravana’s sister Shurpanakha complains that Lakshmana cut off her nose and ears, from Chapter 31 of the Aranya Kanda (Book of the Forest) of a “Shangri” Ramayana (Rama’s Journey)

Ravana’s sister Shurpanakha complains that Lakshmana cut off her nose and ears, from Chapter 31 of the Aranya Kanda (Book of the Forest) of a “Shangri” Ramayana (Rama’s Journey)

c. 1690–1710

Northern India, Pahari Region, Himachal Pradesh, possibly Rajput Kingdom of Mandi, court of Sidh Sen (reigned 1684–1727)

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