Memories of the Southern Civil Rights Movement

Willie Ricks was one of SNCC’s great stump speakers, capable of getting great emotional responses from a crowd. During the Meredith March in Mississippi, where King and Stokely Carmichael marched side by side, it was Ricks who first unleashed the “Black Power” cry. Here he speaks in Atlanta

1964, printed later
(American, b. 1942)
Image: 27.9 x 35.6 cm (11 x 14 in.)
Location: not on view
This artwork is known to be under copyright.

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Did You Know?

Willie Ricks contributed to the emergence and language of the Black Power movement.

Description

Nicknamed “The Reverend” for his dynamic oratory, Ricks (born 1943) was recruited for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee in 1963 by James Forman (see 2023.XXX). He worked as a field organizer for SNCC, which employed his considerable talent as a speaker to energize and motivate audiences to actively engage in protest.
Willie Ricks was one of SNCC’s great stump speakers, capable of getting great emotional responses from a crowd. During the Meredith March in Mississippi, where King and Stokely Carmichael marched side by side, it was Ricks who first unleashed the “Black Power” cry.  Here he speaks in Atlanta

Willie Ricks was one of SNCC’s great stump speakers, capable of getting great emotional responses from a crowd. During the Meredith March in Mississippi, where King and Stokely Carmichael marched side by side, it was Ricks who first unleashed the “Black Power” cry. Here he speaks in Atlanta

1964, printed later

Danny Lyon

(American, b. 1942)
America

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